A Fond Farewell to Good Old Hugh Heffner

 

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In my 70+ years of being blessed by living in what I have considered to be the greatest civilization ever to have graced planet Earth, I’ve nevertheless witnessed  continual waves of destruction against the shores of that civilization.  

Hugh Heffner was one such destructive wave.

The beautiful naked ladies were only the unwitting bait, luring a generation of young men to languish, flopping and gasping, on the hot rocking and rolling decks of the good ship “HH Empty Hedonism.” 

The Playboy Philosophy – the Playmate of the Month. Enticing and promising, but only shiny plastic and metal – spinning and luring.

A Playmate of the Month? Each month? Every month?  Count me in!

Married? No matter – count me in!

So a substantial number of that generation – my generation – bought into that dream of perpetual fulfillment … renewed monthly. 

Then reality came to town. Reality came to that penthouse of our dreams. The fortunate among us were abject failures in reaching for that bait. Frustrated, disappointed and angry. “But you promised!!”

But some had a bit more success and captured a sweetie … perhaps it would seem many among the powerful and elite had a bit of success.

We seem to be witness to an interesting phenomena — the frenzy of accusations against powerful men attacking, abusing and molesting women in their lives. The most prominent being the movie mogul Harvey Weinstein, who at last count has had some 80 women accusing him.

But why this sudden moral outrage, especially among the liberal left? Wasn’t Harvey Weinstein simply and very successfully living out the Playboy Philosophy of a new Playmate every month?

Why was/is Hugh Heffner held up as an icon of modern day sexual liberation and a hedonistic lifestyle? Why when someone actually follows that playbook and is spectacularly successful at it, he is demonized and ostracized?

Mr. Hugh Heffner, even though he is now dead,  deserves to be sent to the trash dump of American culture, along with his destructive so-called philosophy — the same trash dump as Mr. Weinstein has apparently been sent. Whenever the scandal of Weinstein is mentioned, it should be with a hyphenated name “Heffner-Weinstein.”

But this is not likely to happen — just the other day as I was browsing the books and magazines at Target, there it was right before me: A Time Magazine special edition featuring Hugh Heffner, in flattering glory — and a few covers down, a Newsweek cover with a very unflattering Harvey Weinstein glaring from the cover.

How many women, families and children have suffered because of  Hugh Heffner, and those many husbands who followed him and his demonic philosophy?

 

 

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The Greatest Generation: bitter-sweet

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Sweet because I have had the high honor and privilege of knowing some of these men in recent years who have called me friend and shipmate.  Bitter in knowing the friendships would be short-lived.

The young men above are three of the “greatest”:  Bob Allard, Gene Beckstrom and I don’t know the third young man.  In September we lost Bob Allard, and then in mid-November we lost Gene Beckstrom.

I met Bob Allard briefly at a ship reunion in Denver, and that was a sweet experience. Gene and Bob served together on the Porterfield down in the fire-rooms, but hadn’t seen one another since 1946 and the end of the war. When Bob saw Gene, his countenance lit up and he shouted out “Beckstrom – where the hell have you been? I’ve been looking for you for years.” 

I was the mouse in the corner eaves-dropping on this wonderful reunion, and dared not intrude.

Bob gave the picture of the three shipmates to Gene who from that point on treasured it. The next year (2016) at the San Diego, Gene once more proudly brought out that picture. Gene’s son Bruce – also a Navy veteran – has the picture now.

I’ll greatly miss this man!

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What is the legacy these men leave behind?

When these young man (Gene was 16), along with 10’s of thousands of others, entered the service the German war machine had overrun all of Western Europe, much of Northern Africa, were threatening Great Britain and had invaded the Soviet Union to the east. Germany’s ally Italy was part of the axis juggernaut. 

In the far-east, the Japanese military had brutally invaded Korea, China, Southeast Asia, the Philippines and were threatening New Zealand and Australia. 

So the task facing these young men was daunting indeed.

***  *** ***

What sort of world did these young men, and those who followed, leave behind?

A free Western Europe with representative constitutional governments and free market economies.

Communism was stopped with the former slave nations of Eastern Europe now living as part of the free world.  

The Soviet backed North Korean invasion of South Korea was stopped and South Korea is now a strong, free and successful nation.

Japan has been transformed into a modern free industrial nation.

 

October 23, 1956–The Hungarian Revolution. What would you fight for? What would you die for?

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This day, October 23 marks the 61st anniversary of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution.

It’s hard for many of us in the free world to appreciate times such as those. What drove virtually all segments of Hungarian society, including the military and police, to rise up against their government? What drove so many to risk everything, including their life in an attempt to throw off the tyranny and brutality of a Soviet controlled dictatorship?  

The following articles summarize those days quite well:

Excerpts:

“ … In the days that followed, frequent attacks and skirmishes took place across Budapest and the countryside, as village-based freedom fighters strove to hinder Soviet brigades heading toward the capital. Workers nationwide launched strikes in solidarity with the resisters, and more public demonstrations continued demanding radical change in government. In one particularly gruesome incident, ÁVH troops opened fire on a nonviolent crowd of approximately 10,000 demonstrators gathered before the Parliament House on October 25th, a massacre that killed around 100 people and injured hundreds more; bullet holes from that tragedy are preserved to this day on buildings surrounding Kossuth Square. …” (the picture at the top)

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https://welovebudapest.com/en/2015/10/22/the-freedom-fight-a-chronicle-of-hungarys-1956-revolution/

And an eyewitness to the revolution:

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https://welovebudapest.com/en/2014/10/23/hope-and-tragedy-an-eyewitness-recalls-hungarys-1956-revolution/

A dear friend and Navy Shipmate Adam von Dioszeghy was also an eyewitness – indeed a twice wounded freedom fighter in that 1956 Revolution against tyranny. Read his account below:

http://www.blurb.com/b/8243686-budapest-at-war

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Don Johnson – October 2017

Hungary’s 1956 Revolution


How many remember the 1956 Hungarian Revolution?

It’s coming on 61 years since those days, and Budapest is again honoring those Freedom Fighters who sought to throw off the tyrannical yoke of communism. 

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https://welovebudapest.com/en/2017/10/19/free-budapest-events-honor-hungarys-1956-revolution/

Our dear friend Adam von Dioszeghy was there in 1956. He was also there in 1945 as a 7 year old in the midst of the raging World War II battle of Budapest, pitting the forces of the allied air forces bombing from above, and a fierce street battle between the German Army and the Soviet Red Army in the street directly in front of Adam’s apartment.

Diana and I had the honor of visiting Adam and his wife Aliz in Budapest this past May. Among other things, Adam gave us a tour of those places in Budapest from 1945 and 1956. Click the link below to see the tour.

https://ayearningforpublius.wordpress.com/2017/06/05/a-navy-reunion-and-more-a-personal-walk-through-history/

On returning from Hungary I published a book for Adam. You can see it by clicking on the picture below.

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Adam von Dioszeghy – a friend and a man who knows and values liberty.

I salute you my friend.

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Don Johnson – October 2017

Liberty and the Honor of Respecting the Flag

I’ve always stood for the playing of the National Anthem and the presentation of the American flag. Image result for standing for the national anthem
Has it always been a mark of honor and respect? Or had it become somewhat of a rote habit?

The recent dustups in the NFL with professional athletes sitting or kneeling contrary to the custom of standing with an attitude and posture of respect, coupled with an extended stay in Paris have broadened and deepened my appreciation of this long standing flag etiquette. 

Thousands of American, British, Canadian and French soldiers, sailors and airmen died bringing liberty back to captive France in 1944. More than 18,000 French civilians also died in pushing out the evil of Nazism from France and restoring liberty. Many of the civilian deaths were due to the heavy allied bombings of the coastal Norman cities in places like Saint Lo and Caen.

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The reception of the “liberators” was mixed as could be expected – towns and homes were destroyed, and loved ones lost in the carnage.

But what I found some 73 years later were many memorials of much gratitude on the part of the French. And this gratitude seemed to extend from 1944 to the present day. For example, in driving to the village of Sainte-Mère-Église, I looked up at the second floor of an old building and saw three small and tattered flags – French, British and American. These flags, off the beaten tourist path showed me that someone still held a heart of gratitude.

And in researching further,  I found this story:

“ … Franck Maurouard and his family of Normandy, France, have not forgotten the sacrifices made by American soldiers trying to liberate France from German occupation during World War II.

Each Memorial Day for the past 10 years, Franck, his wife, Anne, and their children, Alexandre, 16, and Eloise, 14, have decorated the graves of two American Rangers who died in the D-Day invasion, June 6, 1944.

They volunteered to care for the graves in Colleville sur Mer cemetery by applying to Les Fleurs de la Memoire, an organization that encourages French citizens to remember on Memorial Day the graves of Americans who gave their lives to liberate France and who remain forever in French soil. Les Fleurs de la Memoire (lesfleursdelamemoire.com) represents 132 French Fraternal Associations, 70 French towns and villages, and 3,677 French citizens who have adopted, in perpetuity, 10,451 graves.

Maurouard, who served in the French Navy for 17 years and is now a laboratory technician at the school where his wife teaches, requested to be assigned the grave of one Ranger from the 2nd Battalion and another from the 5th Battalion. But he has done far more than decorate the graves of Pvt. Joseph Trainor of Wisconsin and Pvt. Elmo Banning of Sedan, Kan.

He researched the details of their deaths and shortened lives and searched for their surviving relatives. He and his family developed a close relationship with Pvt. Banning’s family, now residing in California. … “    Read more  here and here.

I’ve walked the grounds of Colleville sur Mer, and yes, there are flowers at the foot of the grave markers – in 2017.

There are similar stories to be found from other places of liberation.

Why do so many in France still honor  their liberators from 1944?

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I believe it is because liberty has value. And because liberty has value, there is a cost for its purchase, and a cost for its restoration when lost. I believe the French, having lost and regained liberty, go to great lengths to honor that cost – a cost measured in the many lives lost in achieving liberty once more.   

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Fortunately we here in the United States have not experienced the traumatic loss of liberty as was experienced in France in the 1940s. Many of our military have witnessed that loss of liberty elsewhere, and have fought to purchase or restore liberty in hostile places far from home.  There is a yearning for liberty among the oppressed of the world – always has been and always will be.

Perhaps those professional athletes irreverently sitting before the flag are in ways they, or we,  may not fully understand – perhaps they are sitting in ways reflecting that yeaning for liberty they perceive as having been lost.

I respect that right of expression. In years past, and even today, many say “I may not agree with what you say, but I will fight to the death for your right to say it.” 

My wish is that our younger generations would be taught the lessons of places like 1944 France. My wish is that they would learn these lessons and honor those many who did “ … fight to the death for your right to say it.” 

Martin Luther King Jr. found another way to achieve huge change for the good in this nation. Would that the NFL athletes seek other avenues of change.

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Don Johnson – October 2017




Has it been

My Racist Past

Racism is very much a topic today, and I found myself in a very contentious conversation just the other day. I don’t need to discuss it in detail here, but it did leave me with a few thoughts on a few episodes from my past that I would like to share.

Background: My home town, a mining town in Montana, was a melting pot of people from all over the world. In the old days there were NO SMOKING signs in the mines written in 14 different languages. The town had its enclaves of folks from various ethnic  backgrounds: Fin Town, German Gulch, Meaderville (Italian), Dublin Gulch — and more.

For the most part it seemed these groups got along with one another. Miners often had to work day-by-day alongside others with the language of mining the only common language. Oh, each group had their own pet and derogatory names for others not like them, but I don’t recall it went much further than that. My grandmother would often sit at our kitchen table cussing out the “Cousin Jacks” and “Cousin Jennies”. The real no kidding fights were between the union miners and the “Company” and between the fans and students of the rival public high and the Catholic high school football and basketball teams. Over time, the ethnic barriers were sometimes worn away, often by marriage.

But there weren’t many blacks in our town. One fellow, a tall lanky guy, was quite a good swimmer and a team mate of mine – we were friends, and he was one of us.

My dad was a soft spoken sort, and well liked around town, and I don’t recall him expressing racist or anti-Semitic sentiments. Not so with some other adults in my life who often broke out in strong racist, ethnic or anti-Semitic tirades. I think I escaped this sort of racism for the most part, and in later years fully bought into King’s “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character” philosophy of life.

But there was that one episode.

It was in my first year of college at the local school, and three or four of us were cruising around town, mid-day one Saturday,  drinking a few too many beers. We came across one of the few blacks in town, on old man as I recall, slowly crossing the street with a bit of a physical walking effort. The four of us decided this old man would be a good target for some fun. So we started harassing this guy for no other reason than that he was black. The names and insults came out and it was great fun. Then it was over and I went on about living the rest of my life without giving this vile episode further thought.

Years later – about 20 – Jesus Christ came into my life. Shortly thereafter, thoughts of that episode, that had been dead and buried in the back of my mind and soul, came very suddenly and vividly to the front of my remembrance and I could see it replayed right before me.

But what was I to do? I had no idea who he was — he was old at the time and by now, some twenty years later, he undoubtedly had passed on. I was trapped — there was no way I could replay that tape and seek out that old man and beg his forgiveness.

What was I to do?

Psalm 32:5
Then I acknowledged my sin to you and did not cover up my iniquity. I said, “I will confess my transgressions to the LORD.” And you forgave the guilt of my sin.

Colossians 2:13
When you were dead in your sins and in the uncircumcision of your flesh, God made you alive with Christ. He forgave us all our sins. …

1 John 1:9
If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness.

Through verses such as these, I discovered in a very real and personal way, why Jesus Christ came into this world. He came to become sin in my stead and provide a forgiveness of sin — even one as vile as the one I recalled from that Saturday many years past.

I have this thought about that old man. One day I will meet him in Heaven, and will go to him seeking his forgiveness. He then reaches out with a big smile on his face and gives me a big hug saying “I have no idea what you are talking about — lets go sit awhile and talk.” 

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The next episode is not one of an act, but one rather of thought and reflection.

It was years after the episode above, perhaps 10 years ago or so.

I was sitting on an airplane, in the very last row. In the seats right in front of me was a Jewish family, and right in front of them a black family.

In a mood of reflection I was grateful for who I was, where I was, and when I was — let me explain.

The “who I was … ” — a white man living in a free United States of America early in the 21st century.

In years past, in my own nation, I could have “owned” that black family and could have done whatever I pleased with them as a family and as individuals. That’s no longer possible, because of great sacrifice by many who preceded me.

In years past in a different nation, I could have rounded up that Jewish family, locked them in a cattle car and sent them off to gruesome slavery and death in a Nazi death camp. That’s no longer possible. Again,  because of great sacrifice by many who preceded me. 

So on that airplane — and now, I am grateful.

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Continuing in this reflective mood, I am reminded that all of us — all of us, me included and especially me — of whatever the color of our skin, are susceptible to the vilest of thoughts and actions.

But as I discovered of my sin in Butte Montana, there is a better way —

Galatians 3:28 There is neither Jew nor Gentile, neither slave nor free, nor is there male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.
             (Christ Jesus being the creator spoken of in Genesis 1)

Genesis 1:27 So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them.
(He created one race, the Human Race. Not white, black, brown or yellow)

Don Johnson — October 2017

Our Broken Obama Military Can’t Even Manage to Toss Out Traitors

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Please read this commentary —

https://townhall.com/columnists/kurtschlichter/2017/10/02/draft-n2389301

Edit —

And please read Senator Rubio’s remarks —

https://pjmedia.com/trending/2017/10/04/sen-rubio-wants-commie-west-point-officer-drummed-army/

End Edit —

An excerpt from the commentary —

“ …

I don’t enjoy saying that – it gives me no pleasure to have to wonder whether the Army I served in both in active and reserve status for close to 28 years is broken. And it’s not just the Army. The Marines and the Special Ops community, well, they seem to be holding on to the standards the rest have forgotten, but the Navy and the Air Force – they’re broken too. Our military – in terms of strategy, equipment, and leadership, is in crisis. American troops will die if we don’t fix it.

Hell, they already have. … “

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And now my comments:

A tough and very sad commentary by an Army veteran.

I had occasion a few years back to attend an author event at West Point – dinner and the author talk to cadets. To my left at the dinner table was a West Point professor, a major. In conversation I offered a comment that West Point must place much emphasis on history, in particular American history. The major told me, as I recall – and I hope I remember wrong, that there was minimal emphasis on history at the Academy. I was …shocked to hear this.

Over the roughly 70 years of the Communist run in the 20th century, over 100,000,000 people died at the hands of this government sponsored reign of terror in the Soviet Union, China, Cambodia, Cuba and elsewhere. How is it possible that future leaders of our military could not be taught this huge lesson of history?

Will the military academies revamp their programs and their testing to assure that each cadet learns the lessons needed to understand why they are sending young warriors to battle in places like Normandy, Vietnam and Korea. General Eisenhower insisted that soldiers and local German citizens tour the Nazi death camps and take as many pictures as possible. He did this so that history would remember what happened, and why so many liberating soldiers, sailors and airmen died in snuffing out this Satanic evil that had captured most of Europe. Will future cadets be required to view, read and study these atrocities in depth — including the Communist atrocities?

Unfortunately, there aren’t the vivid pictures and testimonies of the record of Communism.

This man, now a commissioned officer and leader of men must be drummed out of the corp. quickly. And he needs to be drummed out with much humiliation and publicity lest we see repeats of the Ft. Hood massacre.

 

Don Johnson – October 2017