Honoring the Flag


Heroes

Sports stadiums and sports celebrities are getting top billing these days – but for the wrong reasons.

Perhaps contributing to this is that  a very small percentage – 1 or 2% – of the population are on active duty in the military these days. It’s easy to think that the national anthem is for the entertainment of sports fan and sports celebrities who can manipulate the national anthem and flag honoring as props for current Social Justice agendas.

But military folks – active duty, families and veterans – typically take a very much different view. I’m a Navy vet from the 1960s, so let me recall some of the protocol regarding the flag.

When out walking around base in the early morning hours toward the pier and “colors”  was heard, you stopped, stood at attention, and if in uniform you saluted in the direction of the raising flag. Likewise at the end of the day when the colors were “retired” and lowered, you stopped what you were  doing, turned towards the lowering flag and saluted. When boarding the ship we turned to the flag, saluted it and requested permission to board the ship. This is protocol and what is expected of  our military and civilians when on board a military base. 

Let me tell you about the four young sailors above – David Crabbe, Jim Devin, Dave Lesh and Frankie Paxton.

These four went through the daily protocol I described, and when it really mattered, put their commitment to the ultimate test. Following their deployment to Vietnam on the USS Porterfield, a US Navy destroyer, they were on the way home to San Diego. A typhoon delayed that trip when a shipmate lay badly injured on the deck, unconscious and in danger of  being washed overboard to his death. These four sailors risked their own lives in rescuing their fallen shipmate, with Devin actually being washed overboard in the effort. The event ended well, with injuries but no deaths, and Devin rescued hours later in the midst of that typhoon.

LetterFromAPilot 

Then there is this image of the family of a fallen soldier who will be left with memories, pictures and a folded American flag. 

These heroes of real life served, fought and many died believing “I may not agree with what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.” 

Yes, you have the right to publicly dishonor the flag and the National Anthem. But you ought not to exercise that right.

Don Johnson – September 2017  

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