Did the Universe Create Itself?


Stephen Hawking believes that the universe created itself out of nothing “ … tiny quantum fluctuations in the very early universe became the seeds from which galaxies, stars, and ultimately human life emerged. “Science predicts that many different kinds of universe will be spontaneously created out of nothing. It is a matter of chance which we are in,”  He further states that God did not create the universe and the “Big Bang” was an inevitable consequence of the laws of physics.  Hawking’s assertion is based upon the idea that physical laws of the universe inevitably lead to the spontaneous creation of the universe, without the necessity of a creator or any other kind of “first cause.” So let me take a shot at that from a layman’s perspective, and with 4 decades of experience as a software developer working in very complex systems.

First let me lay some groundwork by summarizing some things about the “laws of physics” and some of the known physical attributes and constants of the universe. I’ve included them below and you can skim through the tedium if you wish, or dwell on it yourself; I’ll present my questions and conclusions here for you to consider.

My summary of the matter:


When I look at these physical laws and constants, the first thing I notice is that they describe a real no-kidding physical system. I also notice that they are there for the purpose of describing and constraining a real no-kidding physical system, namely the universe we all live in.

So if these laws of physics and the constraining constants  apply to an already created universe no matter the creator, then why are they there in the first place. They seem to provide no mechanisms to form a universe, but only serve to describe the end result of the creation. Where is the motivation, where is the intelligent drive that will create a universe to fit into these laws and constraints?

Where is the first and preeminent  “law of physics” that describes the creation of the laws of physics  and the constants themselves so that we can know about and study our own universe?

Something is missing here Dr. Hawking! You make the claim that  “ … many different kinds of universes will be spontaneously created out of nothing …” but you neglect to mention that in the beginning there indeed was “something,”  not “nothing” as you claim, but at the very least the laws of physics. And who or what created these laws Dr. Hawking?  What or who, Dr. Hawking, created the Laws of Thermodynamics?

So why do I care and why do I study & write about such things?

There is and has been a concerted effort among certain segments of society and also of science to eliminate all possibility of God. In particular, they want to eliminate God from the world of the younger generations, and in doing so they allow those who would impose their own godless world view on society, even though they themselves may have no such intent. The consequences of this effort is to remove the moral laws that a belief in God provides.

For example, consider the Ten Commandments. The Commandments begin by positing a transcendent God to which all mankind is accountable to. The Commandments continue with a moral code proscribing the behavior of mankind. Thou shall not kill places a significant boundary on the behavior and relationship between all mankind that protects the lives and well being of us all. When that boundary is removed, along with the transcendent accountability for such actions, then we should expect horrific societal behavior as a result.   

So I believe it is important to stay abreast of this issue and make comment such as to counter what I see as a destructive trend.

Don Johnson – January 2013 


Note:
The information below is taken from the article Major Laws of Physics: by Andrew Zimmerman Jones at
http://physics.about.com/od/physics101thebasics/p/PhysicsLaws.htm 


About Physical Laws:

Over the years, one thing scientists have discovered is that nature is generally more complex than we give it credit for. The following laws of physics are considered fundamental, but many of them refer to idealized, closed systems, which are hard to obtain in the real world. Also, some are altered slightly in different circumstances. The laws that Newton developed, for example, are modified by the findings of the theory of relativity, but they are still basically valid in most regular cases that you’ll run into.

Newton’s Three Laws of Motion:

Sir Isaac Newton developed the Three Laws of Motion, which describe basic rules about how the motion of physical objects change. Newton was able to define the fundamental relationship between the acceleration of an object and the total forces acting upon it.

“Law” of Gravity:

Newton developed his “Law of Gravity” to explain the attractive force between a pair of masses. In the twentieth century, it became clear that this is not the whole story, as Einstein’s theory of general relativity has provided a more comprehensive explanation for the phenomenon of gravity. Still, Newton’s law of gravity is an accurate low-energy approximation that works for most of the cases that you’ll explore in physics.

Conservation of Mass-Energy:

The total energy in a closed or isolated system is constant, no matter what happens. Another law stated that the mass in an isolated system is constant. When Einstein discovered the relationship E=mc2 (in other words that mass was a manifestation of energy) the law was said to refer to the conservation of mass-energy. The total of both mass and energy is retained, although some may change forms. The ultimate example of this is a nuclear explosion, where mass transforms into energy.

Conservation of Momentum:

The total momentum in a closed or isolated system remains constant. An alternative of this is the law of conservation of angular momentum.

Laws of Thermodynamics:

The laws of thermodynamics are actually specific manifestations of the law of conservation of mass-energy as it relates to thermodynamic processes.

Electrostatic Laws:

Coulomb’s law and Gauss’s law are formulations of the relationship between electrically charged particles to create electrostatic force and electrostatic fields. The formulas, it turns out, parallel the laws of universal gravitation in structure. There also exist similar laws relating to magnetism and electromagnetism as a whole.

Invariance of the Speed of Light:

Einstein’s major insight, which led him to the Theory of Relativity, was the realization that the speed of light in a vacuum is constant and is not measured differently for observers in different inertial frames of reference, unlike all other forms of motion. Some theoretical physicists have conjectured different variable speed of light (VSL) possibilities, but these are highly speculative. Most physicists believe that Einstein was right and the speed of light is constant.

Modern Physics & Physical Laws:

In the realm of relativity and quantum mechanics, scientists have found that these laws still apply, although their interpretation requires some refinement to be applied, resulting in fields such as quantum electronics and quantum gravity. Care should be taken in applying them in these situations.


And let me include a partial listing of some constants that define the universe we live in. These are taken from a previous article I wrote The Origins of the Universe … Simple or Complex: Part 2 … The Problem of “Massively Complex Synchronicity” at: https://ayearningforpublius.wordpress.com/2012/06/25/the-origins-of-the-universe-simple-or-complex-part-2-the-problem-of-massively-complex-synchronicity/

Constants in the category ” Universal constants “…

characteristic impedance of vacuum
electric constant
magnetic constant
Newtonian constant of gravitation
Newtonian constant of gravitation over h-bar c
Planck constant
Planck constant in eV s
Planck constant over 2 pi
Planck constant over 2 pi in eV s
Planck constant over 2 pi times c in MeV fm
Planck length
Planck mass
Planck mass energy equivalent in GeV
Planck temperature
Planck time
speed of light in vacuum

Constants in the category ” Electromagnetic constants “…

Bohr magneton
Bohr magneton in eV/T
Bohr magneton in Hz/T
Bohr magneton in inverse meters per tesla
Bohr magneton in K/T
conductance quantum
elementary charge
elementary charge over h
inverse of conductance quantum
Josephson constant
magnetic flux quantum
nuclear magneton
nuclear magneton in eV/T
nuclear magneton in inverse meters per tesla
nuclear magneton in K/T
nuclear magneton in MHz/T
von Klitzing constant

Constants in the category ” Atomic and nuclear constants “…

alpha particle mass
alpha particle mass energy equivalent
alpha particle mass energy equivalent in MeV
alpha particle mass in u
alpha particle molar mass
alpha particle-electron mass ratio
alpha particle-proton mass ratio
Bohr radius
classical electron radius
Compton wavelength
Compton wavelength over 2 pi
deuteron g factor
deuteron magnetic moment
deuteron magnetic moment to Bohr magneton ratio
deuteron magnetic moment to nuclear magneton ratio
deuteron mass
deuteron mass energy equivalent
deuteron mass energy equivalent in MeV
deuteron mass in u
deuteron molar mass
deuteron rms charge radius
deuteron-electron magnetic moment ratio
deuteron-electron mass ratio
deuteron-neutron magnetic moment ratio
deuteron-proton magnetic moment ratio
deuteron-proton mass ratio
electron charge to mass quotient
electron g factor
electron gyromagnetic ratio
electron gyromagnetic ratio over 2 pi
electron magnetic moment
electron magnetic moment anomaly
electron magnetic moment to Bohr magneton ratio
electron magnetic moment to nuclear magneton ratio
electron mass
electron mass energy equivalent
electron mass energy equivalent in MeV
electron mass in u
electron molar mass
electron to alpha particle mass ratio
electron to shielded helion magnetic moment ratio
electron to shielded proton magnetic moment ratio
electron-deuteron magnetic moment ratio
electron-deuteron mass ratio
electron-helion mass ratio
electron-muon magnetic moment ratio
electron-muon mass ratio
electron-neutron magnetic moment ratio
electron-neutron mass ratio
electron-proton magnetic moment ratio
electron-proton mass ratio
electron-tau mass ratio
electron-triton mass ratio
Fermi coupling constant
fine-structure constant
Hartree energy
Hartree energy in eV
helion g factor
helion magnetic moment
helion magnetic moment to Bohr magneton ratio
helion magnetic moment to nuclear magneton ratio
helion mass
helion mass energy equivalent
helion mass energy equivalent in MeV
helion mass in u
helion molar mass
helion-electron mass ratio
helion-proton mass ratio
inverse fine-structure constant
muon Compton wavelength
muon Compton wavelength over 2 pi
muon g factor
muon magnetic moment
muon magnetic moment anomaly
muon magnetic moment to Bohr magneton ratio
muon magnetic moment to nuclear magneton ratio
muon mass
muon mass energy equivalent
muon mass energy equivalent in MeV
muon mass in u
muon molar mass
muon-electron mass ratio
muon-neutron mass ratio
muon-proton magnetic moment ratio
muon-proton mass ratio
muon-tau mass ratio
neutron Compton wavelength
neutron Compton wavelength over 2 pi
neutron g factor
neutron gyromagnetic ratio
neutron gyromagnetic ratio over 2 pi
neutron magnetic moment
neutron magnetic moment to Bohr magneton ratio
neutron magnetic moment to nuclear magneton ratio
neutron mass
neutron mass energy equivalent
neutron mass energy equivalent in MeV
neutron mass in u
neutron molar mass
neutron to shielded proton magnetic moment ratio
neutron-electron magnetic moment ratio
neutron-electron mass ratio
neutron-muon mass ratio
neutron-proton magnetic moment ratio
neutron-proton mass difference
neutron-proton mass difference energy equivalent
neutron-proton mass difference energy equivalent in MeV
neutron-proton mass difference in u
neutron-proton mass ratio
neutron-tau mass ratio
proton charge to mass quotient
proton Compton wavelength
proton Compton wavelength over 2 pi
proton g factor
proton gyromagnetic ratio
proton gyromagnetic ratio over 2 pi
proton magnetic moment
proton magnetic moment to Bohr magneton ratio
proton magnetic moment to nuclear magneton ratio
proton magnetic shielding correction
proton mass
proton mass energy equivalent
proton mass energy equivalent in MeV
proton mass in u
proton molar mass
proton rms charge radius
proton-electron mass ratio
proton-muon mass ratio
proton-neutron magnetic moment ratio
proton-neutron mass ratio
proton-tau mass ratio
quantum of circulation
quantum of circulation times 2
Rydberg constant
Rydberg constant times c in Hz
Rydberg constant times hc in eV
Rydberg constant times hc in J
shielded helion gyromagnetic ratio
shielded helion gyromagnetic ratio over 2 pi
shielded helion magnetic moment
shielded helion magnetic moment to Bohr magneton ratio
shielded helion magnetic moment to nuclear magneton ratio
shielded helion to proton magnetic moment ratio
shielded helion to shielded proton magnetic moment ratio
shielded proton gyromagnetic ratio
shielded proton gyromagnetic ratio over 2 pi
shielded proton magnetic moment
shielded proton magnetic moment to Bohr magneton ratio
shielded proton magnetic moment to nuclear magneton ratio
tau Compton wavelength
tau Compton wavelength over 2 pi
tau mass
tau mass energy equivalent
tau mass energy equivalent in MeV
tau mass in u
tau molar mass
tau-electron mass ratio
tau-muon mass ratio
tau-neutron mass ratio
tau-proton mass ratio
Thomson cross section
triton g factor
triton magnetic moment
triton magnetic moment to Bohr magneton ratio
triton magnetic moment to nuclear magneton ratio
triton mass
triton mass energy equivalent
triton mass energy equivalent in MeV
triton mass in u
triton molar mass
triton-electron mass ratio
triton-proton mass ratio
weak mixing angle

Constants in the category ” Physico-chemical constants “…

atomic mass constant
atomic mass constant energy equivalent
atomic mass constant energy equivalent in MeV
Avogadro constant
Boltzmann constant
Boltzmann constant in eV/K
Boltzmann constant in Hz/K
Boltzmann constant in inverse meters per kelvin
Faraday constant
first radiation constant
first radiation constant for spectral radiance
Loschmidt constant (273.15 K, 100 kPa)
Loschmidt constant (273.15 K, 101.325 kPa)
molar gas constant
molar Planck constant
molar Planck constant times c
molar volume of ideal gas (273.15 K, 100 kPa)
molar volume of ideal gas (273.15 K, 101.325 kPa)
Sackur-Tetrode constant (1 K, 100 kPa)
Sackur-Tetrode constant (1 K, 101.325 kPa)
second radiation constant
Stefan-Boltzmann constant
Wien frequency displacement law constant
Wien wavelength displacement law constant

2 responses to “Did the Universe Create Itself?

  1. Pingback: Who Made God? A Response From The Author | A Yearning for Publius

  2. Pingback: Maybe We Should Pay More Attention To The Bible … Part 5: Can we trust the Bible as truth? | A Yearning for Publius

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